The Bill that Should Have Passed – HB 2564: Inclusionary Zoning

Mary Kyle McCurdy

Land Use Goal 10 requires that all cities provide residential land zoned to meet the housing needs of all Oregonians. During the 2015 legislative session, 1000 Friends worked with a coalition of organizations, individuals, local governments, and businesses that care about affordable housing in an attempt to pass House Bill 2564, which would have enabled local governments to use inclusionary zoning to provide housing opportunities for all, in every neighborhood. Local governments from Hood River to Lincoln County and Corvallis to Milwaukie supported HB 2564.

It's Official: March 22 is Tom McCall Day in Oregon

At 1 pm on April 29, 2015, Governor Kate Brown signed SB 333 into law in the Governor's ceremonial office. From this day forward, March 22 will be Tom McCall Day in Oregon. Tom McCall Jr. attended the signing.

HRVRC Organizes to Support Inclusionary Zoning Legislation

Karli Petrovic

As the Oregon Senate considers the bill to repeal the ban on inclusionary zoning—a housing tool that helps local jurisdictions provide affordable housing options in their communities—it’s important to celebrate the 34-25 vote in the House of Representatives and the groups that helped the bill pass. One of these groups was the Hood River Valley Residents’ Committee. HRVRC, a 1000 Friends of Oregon affiliate group, was particularly effective in organizing and getting the city council to pass a resolution in support of HB 2564.

Legislative Update on our 2015 Priorities

We're at the halfway mark of the Oregon 2015 Legislative Session, which is a significant milestone. Any bill that did not pass out of a policy committee in its chamber of origin is now dead. [Well, it's probably dead. There are ways to revive a dead bill, but it's infrequent and difficult to do.] 

Op-Ed: The Reserves Agreement and Oregon's Future

In an op-ed published March 14 on The Oregonian's website, 1000 Friends Executive Director Jason Miner describes how the urban and rural reserves agreement emerged from a local government's failure, and why supporters of farmland should be prepared to defend it.

2014 Oregon Legislative Recap: 5 Key Takeaways for Land Use

This year's short legislative session was a typically wild ride in Salem. When legislators concluded their work on March 7, we emerged with big wins on some important topics, but also some key questions left unanswered. Here are our 5 key takeaways from this session.

Willamette Week: Bill Could "Bust the Boundary"

Nigel Jaquiss
Willamette Week
Wed, 01/22/2014 - 9:00am

Willamette Week's Nigel Jaquiss reports on an unprecedented bill that could nuke Oregon's established local process for land use planning and force the implementation of Metro's 2011 urban growth boundary expansion.

New 1000 Friends Report Details Dangers of Columbia River Crossing

Oregon is at a pivotal moment in its transportation future. Will we proceed with a risky $2.8 billion-plus Columbia River Crossing project, with Oregon shouldering the whole burden? Our new report outlines the reasons to say "no."

More Super-Siting from the Oregon Legislature?

A potential bill in the 2014 legislative session could usurp citizen appeals and open Washington County farmland to immediate development, The Oregonian's Christian Gaston reports. It's another example of legislative "super-siting": overriding local plans to pave the way for development.

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