Urban Growth Boundaries

1000 Friends Staff and Board
Thu, 07/28/2016 - 12:20pm

It's time to double down on their protection

You may already know UGBs are the single most contested aspect of Oregon’s land use planning program. UGBs make Oregon different by giving landowners certainty, shaping our cities and towns, and enabling our agricultural economy to thrive without risk of urban sprawl. Today UGBs face a pressing threat: special interests are claiming they drive up housing costs.

Oregonians in Action Propose UGB Name Change

Alyson Marchi-Young
Fri, 04/01/2016 - 10:15am

Last month, Oregonians in Action proposed a language change for statewide documents.

Dispelling the Myth of UGB's and Affordability

Alyson Marchi-Young and Mary Kyle McCurdy
Wed, 03/30/2016 - 4:55pm

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  • Metro's Chief Operating Officer: Don't Expand the UGB

    Mary Kyle McCurdy

    1000 Friends of Oregon applauds the recommendation of Metro's Chief Operating Officer that Metro not expand the regional urban growth boundary (UGB) in 2015, but instead focus on how to grow better inside the UGB. The recommendation points out that the region has enough land inside the UGB for the next 20 years' worth of population and employment growth, and then states:

    "It is time for our region to move on from the land supply debate and consider actions that will:

    Grist.org: "Want to breathe new life into your city? Build a fence around it."

    Nathanel Johnson
    Grist.org
    Tue, 05/06/2014 (All day)

    Grist.org, a national blog devoted to "getting people talking, thinking, and taking action", takes a look at how sharpening the edge of Portland's region helped revive the city's core in a fascinating piece.

    Ben Ross: To Fight Sprawl, Look Closer In

    It may seem that fighting sprawl is all about the edge: have a strong urban growth boundary and and the rest will fall into place. But that's only one piece of the puzzle, argues author Ben Ross. We need also need more places to live in existing communities--yet how can we build that in an age of opposition?

    Springfield Discovers That More Extensive Is More Expensive

    The City of Springfield is considering expanding its urban growth boundary to pursue the possibility of new large-scale employment, but recent calculations show the cost to serve any expansion with infrastructure could be overwhelming.

    The Register-Guard reports:

    City officials have identified five areas where Springfield could expand its urban growth boundary, and roughly calculated how much it would cost to extend sewer and streets and collect stormwater to serve that future development.

    Op-Ed: Land Use Still Works

    "Farmers can farm, and builders can build," writes 1000 Friends Executive Director Jason Miner. "Each plays a vital role in Oregon's future." Read his op-ed published recently by the Portland Tribune, Hillsboro Tribune, and Newberg Graphic.

    Op-Ed: The Reserves Agreement and Oregon's Future

    In an op-ed published March 14 on The Oregonian's website, 1000 Friends Executive Director Jason Miner describes how the urban and rural reserves agreement emerged from a local government's failure, and why supporters of farmland should be prepared to defend it.

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