A Tribute to Hector Macpherson Jr., a Land Use Hero

Jason Miner

I didn't know Hector Macpherson Jr., so some might say I'm an odd choice to write a tribute to him.

Everyone who loves Oregon, however, owes tribute to Hector Macpherson Jr., who, as noted in obituaries and honors across the state, passed away on March 21, 2015. In fact, many farmers wrote to us to share what Hector meant to them (and we share one of those memories in the images below). This is especially pointed considering what our co-founder Henry Richmond said of the farming community:

Housing Opportunity Day and the Fight to Fund Long-Term Housing

Karli Petrovic

By all accounts, the Oregon Housing Alliance’s Housing Opportunity Day was a success. On March 11, 2015, more than 250 advocates participated in the day-long event that began at the First United Methodist Church of Salem and ended at the Capitol. Throughout the day, participants met with more than 50 legislators and covered the Capitol’s steps with 20,000 socks that participants collected to draw attention to a startling statistic: 20,000 children and youth experienced homelessness in 2014. And they aren’t the only ones.

HRVRC Organizes to Support Inclusionary Zoning Legislation

Karli Petrovic

As the Oregon Senate considers the bill to repeal the ban on inclusionary zoning—a housing tool that helps local jurisdictions provide affordable housing options in their communities—it’s important to celebrate the 34-25 vote in the House of Representatives and the groups that helped the bill pass. One of these groups was the Hood River Valley Residents’ Committee. HRVRC, a 1000 Friends of Oregon affiliate group, was particularly effective in organizing and getting the city council to pass a resolution in support of HB 2564.

Legislative Update on our 2015 Priorities

We're at the halfway mark of the Oregon 2015 Legislative Session, which is a significant milestone. Any bill that did not pass out of a policy committee in its chamber of origin is now dead. [Well, it's probably dead. There are ways to revive a dead bill, but it's infrequent and difficult to do.] 

B-Line Sustainable Delivery Proves Good Land Use is Good for Business

Karli Petrovic

When Franklin Jones founded B-Line, a sustainable bike delivery and advertising company, he drew on a wealth of experiences. From his background as a bike and pedestrian planner and then as a sixth-grade humanities teacher to his bike travels through Japan, Europe, and other places abroad, Jones was exposed to the fabric of many cities.

The Clackamas County Food System ONEStop

If you've been following our work with the Rogue Valley Food System Network, you know we're committed to connecting people with fresh local produce. One of the ways this network accomplishes this goal is by connecting farmers, distributors, and other partners in order to minimize shipping costs and get food into the hands of people who need it. Now, a similar food system called ONEStop has emerged to serve people in Clackamas County. Here's a little bit about this initiative:
 

Leadership Spotlight: Elemental Technologies

In this month’s Leadership Spotlight, 1000 Friends caught up with Sam Blackman, CEO and co-founder of Elemental Technologies. As the leader of a top-notch tech firm in the Rose City, Blackman isn’t one to rest on his laurels. His passion for improving his community, city, and state is apparent in the initiatives he supports at Elemental. From volunteer hours to a Community Ambassador program, Blackman is a leader for positive change.

Planning for Natural Hazards in Oregon

To save lives and money, we ask you to support HB 2633.

In January 2010, an earthquake in Haiti killed more than 230,000 people and initially displaced 1.5 million more. Fourteen months later, an earthquake and resulting tsunami in Japan claimed 15,884 lives and cost approximately $300 billion. If you think these disasters are oceans away, consider the $70 million the Oregon Department of Forestry spent fighting major wildfires in the summer of 2013 and the 43 people killed in a mudslide along Highway 503 near Oso, WA, in 2014. In addition, the effects of a changing climate are making matters worse for other natural hazards.

1000 Friends Leadership Spotlight: Organically Grown Company

The largest wholesaler of organic produce in the Pacific Northwest talks farmland protection, industry changes and the future of farming.

As the state’s second largest industry, agriculture is an important part of life in Oregon. Up until recently, however, organic farming wasn’t a large part of the conversation. This is changing. Organically Grown Company, the largest organic produce wholesaler in the Pacific Northwest, is proof of the transformation. Started in 1978 as a nonprofit, OGC mostly supported small-scale organic farms. It transitioned to a for-profit company in 1982, with its first dock opening a year later.

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